Tag Archives: Immortality

Mensch

On or about 03/09/20, my oldest brother was moved into hospice.  He has end-stage Parkinson’s disease, and had stopped eating and drinking.  So he is not long for this world.

To sum up his life, what comes to me first and last is that he’s a mensch, and a role model for a mensch. Continue reading Mensch

Prayer for the dead

When one comes across a story like that of Kendrea Johnson[1], Victoria Martens[2] or Brian Williard[3], one may be moved by a desire to somehow help the deceased, and question what one can do, since the person is, after all, dead.

In the previous post, I said of Kendrea, “You just want to take her in your arms, hug her, and make all the darkness go away.”  Actually, you can — if, at that moment, she is willing to be embraced.  Your intuition will tell you her status in that regard at any given moment; or, may direct you at wholly unexpected times that, at this moment, that is so.  See “Following guidance.”

There is a Jewish expression, “z’l,” meaning “Zikhrono livrakha,” “May his memory be for a blessing.”  The corresponding form for a woman is “Zikhronah livrakha,” “May her memory be for a blessing.”  A corresponding Gentile expression is “O.B.M.,” “of blessed memory.”  Every time one uses such an expression, one honors the person who has passed on, and this is not without its effect beyond the veil.

[1]Related: Give up the word “deserve.”
[2]Related: Forgiving the cosmos
[3]Related: Grief and sublimation
 

A case for the death penalty

Death penalty sought for alleged Boston bomber Tsarnaev

A friend of mine, a Lutheran pastor, opposes capital punishment.  But to my mind, her story, which she told me circa 1985, poses the premiere case for the death penalty.

She had a son, a lively pre-teen, who died suddenly under suspicious circumstances.  At first, police found a person of interest in Arthur Goode, a known pedophile who was known to have been in the area at the time.  It was soon enough established that Goode had been nowhere near the time and place of the death, and the death was ruled accidental.

That did not prevent Goode from harassing the family for years with phone calls and letters in which he spewed forth lurid details of what he now alleged he had done with the boy.
Continue reading A case for the death penalty

14:32

Friday, October 6.

I arrived at the shelter where I stay at 14:32.  There was no line of people waiting admission.  They nominally open the gate at 14:30, but in fact sometimes do at 14:15, 14:00 or even 13:00.  When I later asked what time they’d opened today, I was told 14:30.  That can’t be factual, though: given current intake procedures, they can’t possibly have processed 30+ persons in two minutes.

Marvin arrived at the same time.  I stayed outside to finish a cigarette, and he slipped in in front of me.  He got assigned #41, “my” bunk, a bottom bunk.  I got assigned the only available remaining bunk, #40, a top bunk and thus much less desirable.

If I had arrived only 30 seconds earlier, I would have been assigned “my” bunk, a bottom bunk, the one much more desirable.  I found myself scouring my memory as to anything I could have done to have left church even 30 seconds earlier.  I would recognize the mistake of looking only at my last activities before leaving; whereas 30 seconds at any point during the day would have made the difference.

I would recognize that I was “bargaining.”

Continue reading 14:32

* A case for the death penalty

Death penalty sought for alleged Boston bomber Tsarnaev

A friend of mine, a Lutheran pastor, opposes capital punishment.  But to my mind, her story, which she told me circa 1985, poses the premiere case for the death penalty.

She had a son, a lively pre-teen, who died suddenly under suspicious circumstances.  At first, police found a person of interest in Arthur Goode, a known pedophile who was known to have been in the area at the time.  It was soon enough established that Goode had been nowhere near the time and place of the death, and the death was ruled accidental.

That did not prevent Goode from harassing the family for years with phone calls and letters in which he spewed forth lurid details of what he now alleged he had done with the boy.
Continue reading * A case for the death penalty