Tag Archives: Embracing what is

Chakras complications

At this point in my life, I’m not keen to learn a whole new complicated system.

I may have no choice.

Continue reading Chakras complications

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The Real Reason Why You Haven’t Healed Your Trauma/Depression/Heartbreak

At first I expected this author to affirm the “blame-your-past” orientation of “the prevailing psychological wisdom of our time.”  Instead, she sets forth an intriguing vision remarkably similar to my own, with, for me, remarkably intriguing ramifications that I want to consider further.

Her counsel is to accept What Is.

Continue reading The Real Reason Why You Haven’t Healed Your Trauma/Depression/Heartbreak

Hell has an exit.

“Embracing what is,” a four-part series:
As seen on TV: The new, improved hubris
Belief: The unforgivable sin
Rationalism cannot save us.
• Hell has an exit.

———— ♦ ————

Night-Sky
Connect the dots however you like. Can you connect them all?

The Serenity Prayer does not depend on belief in God, but rather expresses basic principles of life:

God, grant me
the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
the courage to change the things I can,
and the wisdom to know the difference.

This pertains to where one directs one’s attention, how one chooses to feel, and where one focuses one’s desires. These are acts not of the mind, but of the will.

Jeffrey Tayler says, “Given the possibility that terrorists may acquire weapons of mass destruction and nuclear states with faith-based conflicts may let fly their missiles, religion may be said to endanger humanity as a whole. No one who cares about our future can quietly abide the continuing propagation and influence of apocalyptic fables that large numbers of people take seriously and not raise a loud, persistent, even strident cry of alarm.”[15]

Fact: those who direct Iran’s nuclear program aren’t likely to listen to an atheist American Islamophobe.

Continue reading Hell has an exit.

Rationalism cannot save us.

“Embracing what is,” a four-part series:
As seen on TV: The new, improved hubris
Belief: The unforgivable sin
• Rationalism cannot save us.
Hell has an exit.

———— ♦ ————

Rationalists insist that love doesn’t matter. Neither does hope. Neither does joy.

“Rational” and “rationality” refer to the activity of reason. Well and good.

“Rationalist” and “rationalism” refer instead to the dogma that one’s affect ought not be allowed to inform or influence one’s thinking. This is a problem.

Continue reading Rationalism cannot save us.

Belief: The unforgivable sin

“Embracing what is,” a four-part series:
As seen on TV: The new, improved hubris
• Belief: The unforgivable sin
Rationalism cannot save us.
Hell has an exit.

———— ♦ ————

A timely quote from Bertrand Russell:  “Zeal is a bad mark for a cause.  It suggests one is not quite certain.  It is not the vaccinationists, but the anti-vaccinationists, who are zealous.  No one is zealous about arithmetic.”

The homeless shelter where I stay makes us sit through chapel for an hour every night.  A few days ago, this new preacher addressed us for the first time.  Shortly into his presentation, he became hysterical, and stayed that way for fifty minutes.  He wept.  He screamed.  He did not persuade anyone of anything.

Jeffrey Tayler sets forth that atheism is just as settled as arithmetic; but he is just as zealous as that preacher — and just as unpersuasive.  In effect, he preaches only to the choir.

Why?
Continue reading Belief: The unforgivable sin

As seen on TV: The new, improved hubris

“Embracing what is,” a four-part series:
• As seen on TV: The new, improved hubris
Belief: The unforgivable sin
Rationalism cannot save us.
Hell has an exit.

———— ♦ ————

khoisan
The Khoisan have never left the Stone Age. Neither have we.

(I’m not happy with this audio, and will replace it in due course.)

This is the first installment in an anticipated four-part series for which the working title is, “Embracing what is.”

The title for this first installment could be, “As seen on TV: The new, improved hubris.”

It’s gluten-free.

All it needs now is an appearance on Dr. Oz.

How can any trendy, with-it person fail to be atheist?

Of the inertial prevalence of belief, Steve Siebold says, “This wouldn’t be surprising 2,000 or even 200 years ago, but in 2014 it’s almost unbelievable.”

Continue reading As seen on TV: The new, improved hubris