Tag Archives: Developmental psychology

Upward mobility

Now that I’m seeking it, I can talk about it.

Continue reading Upward mobility

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The self-loving reptile

This post has been a long time coming.

Many people in my world are fundamentally reptilian.

This largely accounts for their social marginalization.

The question is how to, for want of a better word, humanize them.

ADVISORY: EXPLICIT LANGUAGE.

Continue reading The self-loving reptile

When needs are met

This is the third of three posts about entitlement:
07/12 – “Entitlement(s): Attitude and policy”
07/19 –
“How I became homeless”
Today – “When needs are met”

I have no trouble sharing my candy, when I have plenty.

Jim Snyder even offers people cigarettes, when he has plenty.

When needs are met, one becomes generous.
Continue reading When needs are met

Simple

In recent weeks, in my quest for spiritual growth and improvement of my own condition, I have had to deal with lots of complicated stuff — chakras, sephirot, different dimensions of the personality or psyche, previously unknown stages in the progression from infantilism to adulthood.

This flies in the face of my conviction that the Gospel must ultimately be simple; and the same for everyone, regardless of one’s circumstances or developmental stage.

I come to the conclusion that it is.  Simple.

Continue reading Simple

A landmark study

(Originally posted 07/08/15.)

Stress in low-income families can affect children’s learning

I am very excited about this.

This is, as far as I know, the first study to attempt to measure the degree of chaos in the home.

The researchers in an earlier-mentioned study (Related:  Poor children have smaller brains) speculated that “poor families tend to live more chaotic lives, and that stress could inhibit healthy brain development.”  The current study seems to indicate that it is directly so.

As of this writing, my hypothesis has become as follows:  the chaos of a growing child’s environment causes comparatively more resources to be devoted to the limbic system and less to the cerebral cortex, resulting in a body with reduced capacity to learn.

Related:  A MUST-READ CONCERNING JUSTICE AND POVERTY
Related: Chaos overwhelms the poor

* A landmark study

Stress in low-income families can affect children’s learning

I am very excited about this.

This is, as far as I know, the first study to attempt to measure the degree of chaos in the home.

The researchers in an earlier-mentioned study (Related:  Poor children have smaller brains) speculated that “poor families tend to live more chaotic lives, and that stress could inhibit healthy brain development.”  The current study seems to indicate that it is directly so.

As of this writing, my hypothesis has become as follows:  the chaos of a growing child’s environment causes comparatively more resources to be devoted to the limbic system and less to the cerebral cortex, resulting in a body with reduced capacity to learn.

Related:  A MUST-READ CONCERNING JUSTICE AND POVERTY
Related: Chaos overwhelms the poor

(Reblogged 10/13/16.)

* When needs are met

This is the third of three posts about entitlement:
04/19 – “Entitlement(s): Attitude and policy”
04/26 –
“How I became homeless”
Today – “When needs are met”

I have no trouble sharing my candy, when I have plenty.

Jim Snyder even offers people cigarettes, when he has plenty.

When needs are met, one becomes generous.
Continue reading * When needs are met