Category Archives: Uncategorized

Tight vs. loose: Additional tags

If you have arrived at this post, it was most likely by searching on one of the below tags. All pertain to the immediately preceding post,

Tight vs. loose: Politics and mysticism

Tags:

D. L. Hughley
Mysticism
Norms
Numbers
Order
Police
Chanetta Powell|
Prisons
Retaliation
Carter Scott
Stephen A. Smith
Charmaine Wilson

Donations puzzle

I just learned that folks have been making donations via GoFundMe that, for some reason, GoFundMe never told me about.

GoFundMe no longer supports the browser I normally use, so I’ll have to go to a different browser to ask them.

In the meantime, if you’re one of those people, please contact me so I can thank you properly.  Some folks have my e-mail; others know me on FaceBook; if you’re not one of those, please use the Contact form on My Resume.

Thank you!

 

Prayer is work, too.

Saint Benedict ran a monastery. He ran into the problem that many monks wanted to spend all their time praying and studying, and not do any of the dirty manual labor — housekeeping, tending livestock, working in the fields — needed to keep the place going. So he adopted and enforced the motto, Laborare est orare — “Work is prayer.”

In excess, religious study can become a drain on society’s resources. Many Haredi, or “ultra-orthodox,” men in Israel want to spend all their time in religious study instead of earning any money. (Article.) Meanwhile, a majority of them live on welfare, with eight to fifteen children. This places a burden on the remainder of society that that economy can no longer bear.

What about me?
Continue reading Prayer is work, too.

Accepting revulsion 1: Wetting the bed

Miscellaneous notes about accepting bad feelings.

[First in a series.]

Vladimir Putin purportedly has a video of Donald Trump directing two whores to pee on a bed that Barack Obama slept in.

Some people think it’s scandalous.

I think it’s hilarious.

Some days ago, I had a mind to post on Facebook that Trump himself is the bed wetter.

Continue reading Accepting revulsion 1: Wetting the bed

Notes: Perceptions of order, courage, and fear of the unknown

As of 2017-02-27, this is a placeholder for notes for a discussion of these things, that may be worked into an actual post either before it’s published or at some later date.

– Courage
– Fear of the unknown, uncertainty, risk, disappointment
– Self-love facilitates desire
Continue reading Notes: Perceptions of order, courage, and fear of the unknown

Unexpected research results

(Originally posted 04/14/12 at Trojan Horse Productions.  Republished here 11/20/13.)

I mean to include in my audition audio files, a telling of the story of the Trojan horse — or Trojan War. I’ve wanted to conclude that telling, with the story of how the man who discovered the modern location of the actual ancient Troy, supposedly did so based on information he saw in a dream. To verify my information, yesterday I read portions of the book Finding the Walls of Troy, by Susan Hueck Allen. I did not find exactly what I was looking for.

Continue reading Unexpected research results

Edgar Cayce’s dream

From Edgar Cayce on the Akashic Records, by Kevin Todeschi

I see myself as a tiny dot out of my physical body, which lies inert before me. I find myself oppressed by darkness and there is a feeling of terrific loneliness. Suddenly, I am conscious of a white beam of light. As this tiny dot, I move upward following the light, knowing that I must follow it or be lost.

Continue reading Edgar Cayce’s dream

About Edgar Cayce

Edgar Cayce (1877-1945) is the most thoroughly documented clairvoyant in history.

Typically, he would lie down on a couch as if to take a nap.  A “conductor,” normally his wife, would read certain directions to him.  Thereupon, he would begin to speak, from this sleep-like state, and answer questions that were posed to him.

In this state, he seemed to have access to an infinite storehouse of information. He spoke of things and concepts he could not possibly have had knowledge of in his waking life: chakras, kundalini, the titles and authors of obscure books, the names and addresses of health care practitioners whom he had never heard of, and who had never heard of him, in real life.

A secretary was normally present who would record everything he said in shorthand, and afterwards transcribe it on a typewriter.

Each of these discourses is called a “reading.”  More than 14,000 such “readings” are archived — and catalogued and thoroughly cross-indexed — at the Association for Research and Enlightenment, in Virginia Beach, VA, the organization that was founded for the study of his words.

The vast majority of readings fall into either of two categories: “physical readings” or “life readings.”

A “physical reading” involved a written request from some person suffering a physical ailment.  The person had to provide an address where he or she would be at the time the reading was to take place.  Cayce’s words in such a reading normally began with, “We have the body,” and then he would proceed to speak as if he were physically present with the patient in person.  He would examine the person’s physical body as with some sort of X-ray vision; opine about the nature and origins of the ailment; and prescribe treatment.  If the treatment instructions were followed as given, the patient invariably found relief.

A “life reading,” in contrast, involved an examination of an individual’s current life and supposed past lives, toward the end of understanding the issues and opportunities the person faced.  Cayce’s words in such a reading normally began with, “We have the entity,” “entity” meaning, in effect, “soul.”  He would proceed to set forth the astrological positions of the planets at the time of the person’s birth,(*) and then summarize each of the person’s lives, beginning with the present life and following with each preceding life, in that order.  Thus the words that came up again and again, “Before this, the entity was …”

This catalogue of previous lives was not presumed to be exhaustive.  The Cayce source concerned itself principally with those lives where events and issues occurred most pertinent to the events and issues the seeker faced today.  The Cayce source claimed that it got all that information about the person’s previous lives from “the Akashic records,” a supposed record “on the skein of space-time” of everything the entity had ever done.

On one occasion, after a life reading, Cayce gave a description of the dream-like experience he normally went through when giving such a reading.  That text appears in the next post here below.

Some of the readings use vague, disjointed, almost incoherent language, pretty much just what one might expect from any man talking in his sleep.  Most, however, are so cogent that one can hardly believe they came from a sleeping man.  He speaks lucidly and at times with passion about different aspects of the human condition; of episodes in Bible history, and the person and significance of Jesus.  Those readings have gained him an avid following.

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(*)In preparing for this post, I came across an excerpt from Amazing Randi’s Flim Flam that presumes to debunk Edgar Cayce completely.  By turns sarcastic and — sarcastic — Randi opines that many of the concoctions Cayce prescribed were probably noxious, and that many patients would likely have gotten better without following Cayce’s directions at all.  It came to me:  anyone wanting to confirm or disconfirm Cayce’s accuracy could easily do so by checking the astrological information present in each life reading.  The subjects’ birthdates are all in the record.