Category Archives: The William Tell Show

Senior moment

Late in the day Tuesday, it came to me that the older I get, and presumably the more mature and the wiser I get, the more likely people I meet are to do and say things that strike me as immature or foolish.

Points:

(1) The elder has a duty to offer her or his wisdom as needed.

(2) I must keep in mind:  that person is the me I once was.  I used to act that way.  I used to think that way.

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Issues with upcoming posts

(Originally posted 01/29/14.)

In the process of “recycling” old posts on Wednesdays(*), I am now coming upon a number of posts with which I’m not completely comfortable. I probably would not write them, now or in the future, the way I did at the time; but I’m also still not sure exactly how I’d write them differently.

At the time I wrote those posts, I supposed my homelessness would be brief, and William Tell would soon enough become a public figure able to speak to what he saw as the pressing social issues. My homelessness continues eighteen months later, and my perceptions of those issues have changed.
Continue reading Issues with upcoming posts

Shopping list

(Originally posted 01/27/14.)

When I get my own place, there’s no need to move in all at once.  I can do it in stages; the shelter’s still available.  And this will make less for me to have to carry at any one time.

So, here’s my daydream of the sequence of different things I can buy on different occasions.  Lucky for me, I can probably buy all these items at Family Dollar.  I don’t plan to be extravagant, but with the income I’ll have, relative my needs, there’s no need to be cheap, either.
Continue reading Shopping list

Gun control editorial misfires

Alternative Fact of the Week: Chicago as gun grabber paradise

The William Tell Show faces an uphill battle.

In any marketplace, one can only buy what’s made available for sale. Someone makes decisions about what’s made available for sale. In the marketplace of ideas, if the decision-maker is lacking in wisdom, emotional maturity, or emotional intelligence, then ALL that’s made available for sale is likely to reflect those same deficiencies. And such is the situation in the media today: Americans have few good role models for responsible, adult free speech.

Phrases like “mindless regurgitation” have no place in a serious piece that desires to be taken seriously.

Related: Free Speech Handbook Guideline #5: Avoid pejoratives.
Related: Free Speech Handbook Guideline #6: Avoid sarcasm.

The End of Anger, by Ellis Cose (2001) …

… is a slim volume for $24.99. The description on inside front dust jacket concludes it “may well be the most important book dealing with race to be published in recent decades.” That strikes me as presumptuous. The front matter includes a list of the author’s other titles, from which it appears he seldom writes about anything else.

Yet the portions I browsed remind me of something I want to do on my own show. The preface examines in some detail changes in public opinion polls between 2008 and 2010. I don’t attach the weight to these facts that Cose does. But if, for example, the President’s approval rating rises with one group and falls with another group in the same time frame, I would like to find out from listeners whose opinions changed and why; to examine with listeners how their thinking works, and on what bases their opinions change.

(Originally posted 05/12/12 at Trojan Horse Productions.  Reposted 01/22/14.)

The Gospel vs. George F. Will

David Farenthold, “Austerity is a hard nut to crack”
George F. Will, “2013’s lesson for conservatives”

Farenthold asks what’s best for the country.  Will asks what’s best for conservatives.  That difference illustrates what Trojan Horse Productions and The William Tell Show are all about.
Continue reading The Gospel vs. George F. Will

The Gospel vs. George Will, and other stories

In “recycling” these old posts, my practice has normally been to reproduce the whole post.  In this instance, I’ll merely link to it:

The Gospel vs. George Will, and other stories

What got me at this writing was this passage, which strikes me as awfully current:

“Josh Barro is one of those who just didn’t get it. To me, the whole row has been about free speech. It is unacceptable in this country that mere shifts of the zeitgeist should force an individual’s conscience; that we should become a thought-police state.”

That was dated 01/11/14.  I’m struck that we may now be at greater risk than ever, of becoming a thought-police state.