Category Archives: The Way of Peace

Rejoice in others’ blessings

If a young man at my church had done this,
he’d still be alive today.

Continue reading Rejoice in others’ blessings

Rainbows

(Originally published 2013-07-04 at Trojan Horse Productions; reblogged 2014-08-27.)

Baltimore is more likely than other places, to have weather when you can see rainbows. We are coming now into a period when this is especially so. We will probably have another such time again in September.

The key to seeing rainbows is, three things have to happen at the same time:
(1) The sun is shining
(2) while it rains, and
(3) there is blue sky somewhere.
Continue reading Rainbows

Choosing chaos

The problem isn’t that the system’s white.
The problem is that it’s a system at all.

I first meant to title this, “Choosing disorder,” but settled on using a word that’s a bit more edgy, and consistent with my past vocabulary.

There are interesting relationships among some words. Continue reading Choosing chaos

In playground murder, 12-year-old boy charged as an adult

Bookmarks:
In playground murder, 12-year-old boy charged as an adultHomeless woman beaten by cop speaks outRussian “aid” convoy in UkraineFirst steps in dealing with a problem drinker

Continue reading In playground murder, 12-year-old boy charged as an adult

Was there a Jesus? If so, what was he like?

In many cases, you can strip away the fictions surrounding a legendary figure, and discover the historical original.

For example, there probably was a King Arthur.

Troy was a real place, and the Trojan War a real event. Achilles, Odysseus and Agamemnon were probably real people.

What about the Jesus of the Bible?

Circumstantial evidence exists to suggest there probably was such a person. Textual evidences are available to suggest what he may have been like. He may or may not have been as Christianity presents.
Continue reading Was there a Jesus? If so, what was he like?

Unlocking the vision

Proverbs 29:18:  “Where there is no vision, the people perish.”

I saw it any number of times while teaching:  give a child a musical instrument, or the discovery of any other talent, whether art, or sports, or some special interest; and it just transforms that life.  The vision of the excellence he or she can achieve, the beauty she or he can create, unlocks vast positive energies.  The mediocre-at-best student comes to excel in every subject.  The child who was awkward and socially withdrawn begins to shine.
Continue reading Unlocking the vision

Un[b]locking the spirit

Pray for yourself first.

When you pray for someone, you become a channel through which the Holy Spirit (or “Life Force”) flows to address that person’s needs.  (See Mark 5:30.)  You may or may not perceive this flow as it happens.

The Spirit must first address any deficiencies in the channel itself, before it can optimally address the other person.  In particular, the Spirit must address any emotional imbalances that may exist in the person who intends to pray.  Without this adjustment, at best the Spirit’s flow will be constricted; at worst, the channel may project his or her own needs (e.g. anxieties, aches and pains) onto the patient.
Continue reading Un[b]locking the spirit

The New Life Clinic

I recently came across the web page for The New Life Clinic.  This appears to be new.  It’s modest, but says enough.

The New Life Clinic

The New Life Clinic happens at Mt. Washington United Methodist Church, 5800 Cottonworth Av., Baltimore, MD at noon every Thursday.  The service lasts about an hour, and includes individual prayer with the laying on of hands.

I’d encourage anyone in Baltimore to go.

They’ve always kept a very low profile.  In 2013, not sure whether the New Life Clinic was still in operation, I phoned the church office.  The pre-recorded message didn’t mention it.  Yet the services I’ve attended were all standing-room-only with people who’d come from all over the world; many of them also patients at one of Baltimore’s world-class hospitals.

I seek to model my practice on theirs.

(Originally posted 06/30/14.)

This Ancient Philosophy Is What We Desperately Need In Our Modern Lives

Another link from Brian Williard:

This Ancient Philosophy Is What We Desperately Need In Our Modern Lives

Growing up, all the word “Stoic” meant to me was keeping a stiff upper lip in the face of adversity.

Not until 1989, when I was taking the Synoptics course at St. Mary’s Seminary, did I learn — from Sean Freyne’s The World of the New Testament, which I highly recommend for many reasons — that there is a great deal more to it, including much to like.

Stoicism is a life of ordered joy.

As you read this article, please note the many similarities between the approach to life described there, and the things I have said here about presence.

Carolyn Gregoire also wrote the first article I mentioned about emotional intelligence,  “How emotionally intelligent are you?”

———— ♦ ————

And yet another link from Brian Williard:

Google’s ‘Jolly Good Fellow’ On The Power Of Emotional Intelligence

Looks like links to Carolyn Gregoire are becoming pretty common on this blog.

Don’t scoff at the headline.  From the gentleman in question here, Chade-Meng Tan, comes another ringing endorsement of meditation and presence as I have discussed them.  I note that the first exercise described in the article is tantamount to what I call prayer, and practically the same as I proposed in “You don’t need an invitation to love people.”

(Originally posted 2014-06-21.)