Category Archives: National media

Beans and rice

Trump’s Budget Would Partly Replace Food Stamp Benefits With Canned Goods

I respond to the first paragraph only. Nothing else. The first paragraph.

Beans and rice are nothing to despise.

I first applied for food stamps in 2004. I had had a professional career for 25 years, and for three generations not one member of my family had ever been subject to any form of “welfare.” Now I sat in a 40-by-40 lobby full of people, filling out the forms. Assets: –0–. Bank balance: –0–. Income: –0–. And I wept. I cried like a baby.

A sister-in-law, an #immigrant, responded to this news by waging a campaign for the family to disown me. She would later tell her husband she did not want to be married to a man whose brother receives food stamps. To my family’s credit, her campaign failed. I’ve been through tons of difficulty, and to their credit, my blood kin have never left me.

Beans and rice are nothing to despise.

In my current world as a homeless man, I deal with many, many people who persevere in need BECAUSE they despise every single blessing God provides. My only hope, currently an active hope, to improve my own lot, rests in being GRATEFUL for every blessing God provides.

Beans and rice, for example.

So, here we go: Poor people, listen up! Just in case you DON’T despise every single blessing God provides, it’s OK.

#Liberals like @Arthur Delaney stand ever-ready to despise it FOR you.

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Why do roses have thorns?

Are thorns happy?

Friday, December 1, Bounce showed Steven Seagal’s Above the Law.

He always plays opposite some eye candy, a term I learned from a Doonesbury strip about Uncle Duke’s presidential campaign.  In Above the Law, it was Sharon Stone.  In On Deadly Ground, it was Joan Chen, a Chinese actress cast as a Native American, with no real function but to look nice and follow him around.

“Eye candy” isn’t a mere phrase.  I saw again that when I see a pretty woman, such as Stone in that scene, I get a sweet taste in my mouth.  This is a physiological reaction, and potentially raises lots of questions about how we respond to beauty — or ugliness.

Related:  For us.

I have much the same reaction whenever I see a rose.

Which recalls my interactions with that rose bush in the garden. Continue reading Why do roses have thorns?

Gun control editorial misfires

Alternative Fact of the Week: Chicago as gun grabber paradise

The William Tell Show faces an uphill battle.

In any marketplace, one can only buy what’s made available for sale. Someone makes decisions about what’s made available for sale. In the marketplace of ideas, if the decision-maker is lacking in wisdom, emotional maturity, or emotional intelligence, then ALL that’s made available for sale is likely to reflect those same deficiencies. And such is the situation in the media today: Americans have few good role models for responsible, adult free speech.

Phrases like “mindless regurgitation” have no place in a serious piece that desires to be taken seriously.

Related: Free Speech Handbook Guideline #5: Avoid pejoratives.
Related: Free Speech Handbook Guideline #6: Avoid sarcasm.

The End of Anger, by Ellis Cose (2001) …

… is a slim volume for $24.99. The description on inside front dust jacket concludes it “may well be the most important book dealing with race to be published in recent decades.” That strikes me as presumptuous. The front matter includes a list of the author’s other titles, from which it appears he seldom writes about anything else.

Yet the portions I browsed remind me of something I want to do on my own show. The preface examines in some detail changes in public opinion polls between 2008 and 2010. I don’t attach the weight to these facts that Cose does. But if, for example, the President’s approval rating rises with one group and falls with another group in the same time frame, I would like to find out from listeners whose opinions changed and why; to examine with listeners how their thinking works, and on what bases their opinions change.

(Originally posted 05/12/12 at Trojan Horse Productions.  Reposted 01/22/14.)

The Gospel vs. George F. Will

David Farenthold, “Austerity is a hard nut to crack”
George F. Will, “2013’s lesson for conservatives”

Farenthold asks what’s best for the country.  Will asks what’s best for conservatives.  That difference illustrates what Trojan Horse Productions and The William Tell Show are all about.
Continue reading The Gospel vs. George F. Will

The Gospel vs. George Will, and other stories

In “recycling” these old posts, my practice has normally been to reproduce the whole post.  In this instance, I’ll merely link to it:

The Gospel vs. George Will, and other stories

What got me at this writing was this passage, which strikes me as awfully current:

“Josh Barro is one of those who just didn’t get it. To me, the whole row has been about free speech. It is unacceptable in this country that mere shifts of the zeitgeist should force an individual’s conscience; that we should become a thought-police state.”

That was dated 01/11/14.  I’m struck that we may now be at greater risk than ever, of becoming a thought-police state.

“Scandal:” The meaning of the word

(Originally posted 2012-07-28 at Trojan Horse Productions. Note that this was after Aurora and prior to Sandy Hook.  Reposted 2014-01-11.)

I don’t have the wherewithal to actually buy and read newspapers; at the convenience store, I merely read the headlines. I found this article by doing a news Google on “Crofton massacre” — which fact illustrates the point I’ll make below.

Police: Md. man made threat, ‘joker’ reference

The English word “scandal” comes from the Greek skandalon, which literally means “stumbling block;” as in Matthew 18:6, where in the King James Version it is translated as “offense,” and Matthew 13:57, which would be translated literally, “They stumbled at him.”

We find that scandals make two different kinds of people “stumble” in two different ways.
Continue reading “Scandal:” The meaning of the word