Category Archives: Justice

Entitlement(s): Attitude and policy

This is the first of three posts about entitlement:
Today – “Entitlement(s): Attitude and policy”
07/19 – “How I became homeless”
07/26 – “When needs are met”

Let’s get rid of (the term) entitlements

“In 2012, Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid alone represented 44 percent of spending; all entitlement programs were 63 percent. But it’s hard to control entitlement programs because their constituencies are so large.”

It makes sense to me that, as Samuelson proposes, we should discard the term “entitlements” as naming portions of the federal budget that are untouchable. No program should be sacrosanct.
Continue reading Entitlement(s): Attitude and policy

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Michael Jackson “son” hoax, and other notes

Bookmarks:
Michael Jackson “son” hoax  •  Interspecies altruism  •  Zookeepers play Mama Bear
Screwed up names spell screwed up people  •  Scandal again  •  My first thought
D.C. homeless housing crisis  • Income inequality

Continue reading Michael Jackson “son” hoax, and other notes

A case for the death penalty

Death penalty sought for alleged Boston bomber Tsarnaev

A friend of mine, a Lutheran pastor, opposes capital punishment.  But to my mind, her story, which she told me circa 1985, poses the premiere case for the death penalty.

She had a son, a lively pre-teen, who died suddenly under suspicious circumstances.  At first, police found a person of interest in Arthur Goode, a known pedophile who was known to have been in the area at the time.  It was soon enough established that Goode had been nowhere near the time and place of the death, and the death was ruled accidental.

That did not prevent Goode from harassing the family for years with phone calls and letters in which he spewed forth lurid details of what he now alleged he had done with the boy.
Continue reading A case for the death penalty

Eggsactly right; and other news

Bookmarks:
The flap over eggs  •  Amanda Knox   •  Another child star meltdown
Child porn is not so simple   •   Promise for Parkinson’s   •  Bail is for the birds
Birth injury fund sought

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Missouri AG challenges California egg law

This came up in Yahoo!’s “Trending Now,” and the search results included pages at newsmax.com and examiner.com.  I had to search a bit to find an article at a REPUTABLE site.  For everyone’s information, in general henceforth I will avoid clicking anything leading to newsmax OR examiner: the former is disreputable, and the latter generates too many ads … too many for me to cause y’all to have to deal with.

The new law, in short, seems to me to be good for everyone (read: humanity), and IMO though it’ll cost ’em money, Missouri has no reason to cluck.

Continue reading Eggsactly right; and other news

Two Jews, three opinions

Ethnic differences don’t all need to be A Problem.

A certain woman has struggled for some years with alcoholism.  I have followed her case because she’s close to me and because I am, after all, an alcoholic myself.

Continue reading Two Jews, three opinions

Why do roses have thorns?

Are thorns happy?

Friday, December 1, Bounce showed Steven Seagal’s Above the Law.

He always plays opposite some eye candy, a term I learned from a Doonesbury strip about Uncle Duke’s presidential campaign.  In Above the Law, it was Sharon Stone.  In On Deadly Ground, it was Joan Chen, a Chinese actress cast as a Native American, with no real function but to look nice and follow him around.

“Eye candy” isn’t a mere phrase.  I saw again that when I see a pretty woman, such as Stone in that scene, I get a sweet taste in my mouth.  This is a physiological reaction, and potentially raises lots of questions about how we respond to beauty — or ugliness.

Related:  For us.

I have much the same reaction whenever I see a rose.

Which recalls my interactions with that rose bush in the garden. Continue reading Why do roses have thorns?

Polar bears aren’t teddy bears; etc.

(Originally posted 02/10/14.)

Bookmarks:
To get bail, money talks
Polar bears aren’t all warm fuzzies.
Private planes are nice, but won’t make you happy
A Jewish view of charity

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To get bail, money talks

Bottom line: all across the country, tens of thousands of men and women are behind bars who are not guilty of any crime.

They’re there because they couldn’t post bail.
Continue reading Polar bears aren’t teddy bears; etc.

The dark side of EQ

(Originally posted 02/08/14.)

Adam Grant, The Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence
Daniel Goleman, An Antidote to the Dark Side of Emotional Intelligence

Dilemma:  a hammer can be used either to build a house or to destroy priceless heirlooms.  Possessing the tool of emotional intelligence does not mean one will use it favorably.  What makes the difference?

In anticipating this post, I searched for a traditional term for “emotional intelligence.”  I decided that the traditional term for it is wisdom. The Old Testament consistently refers to people who have emotional intelligence as “wise.”  Those who lack it, it calls “fools.”

In the previous post, we saw that emotional intelligence, or wisdom, is a major determinant of personal effectiveness and success in life; in short, of prosperity.  To the extent one wishes all people to prosper, it seems desirable that all people be wise.

In short, the wise prosper.

But the wise aren’t necessarily good, and the good aren’t necessarily wise.
Continue reading The dark side of EQ