Monthly Archives: December 2015

Coming changes

10:56.  I have a noon appointment with my therapist.  I’d originally thought to stop downtown for coffee afterwards and then go to the mission.  However, last night I got turned away, so I now think to go straight from my doctor’s office to the mission:  I don’t know how long that walk takes.  If I arrive at the mission at 13:45 and have to stand there idle for 45 minutes — after last night, that’s a price I’m willing to pay.

This morning I’d meant to go up to the doctor’s office early, arriving at 11:00, and then try to find someone in Case Management to help me get into transitional housing.  I came to the library first, but it got to be 10:40, meaning I’d have less than an hour to work with the case manager; so I cancelled that plan for today.  Later this week I’ll have opportunities.

The move into transitional housing, and the transition into that move itself, are likely to bring many changes.

Continue reading Coming changes

About the “lost books of the Bible”

My neighbor Jonathan came to this country from Nigeria at least ten years ago. He obviously has never made any effort to acquire an American accent. I dread seeing him come out for smoke break after supper, as that spells a long, loud monologue most of which I’ll find unintelligible.

He’s full of fixed opinions about the Bible. These many books he dismisses as “man-made,” but other verses he holds to with fundamentalist tenacity. It makes no sense to me.

He keeps exhorting me to study the various books that did not find their way into the Protestant canon.

Ain’t gonna happen.

Continue reading About the “lost books of the Bible”

This program turned me away.

Adapted from a 12/03/15 e-mail to my brothers and some others.

Given instability at the shelter where I’ve been for almost five years, I decided to apply to a certain program affiliated with a major national charity and major local soup kitchen.  This program is residential, has a nice facility, and (as I understood it) was geared toward taking men with histories of addiction or homelessness and rendering them self-supporting.

Since it is a residential program, I would no longer have to carry my bags everywhere I go, vastly increasing the radius within which I can look for work; and, I supposed, I would be able to work any shift.  After all, unlike the shelter where I’ve been, they’ve got a big shove towards self-sufficiency.

They rejected me.

I wrote:

Baptismal grace means: when you get knocked down, you get back up.

Blog post (from October ’14, about getting back up): Life in the outer darkness

In the immediate future, I will be checking out options in transitional housing, and case management services at the clinic where I’m currently in treatment for everything I’m in treatment for.

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What happened?

Continue reading This program turned me away.

Is This Stone the Clue to Why Jesus Was Killed?

Is This Stone the Clue to Why Jesus Was Killed?

Here is the latest in a flurry of rather silly articles extolling the supposed archaeological significance of the First Century synagogue at Magdala; which just happens to be located wholly within the confines of a privately-owned Christian tourist resort (hint, hint).

Conspiracies occur.  In my past work as a legal secretary, I had direct contact with secret campaigns to promote certain large corporations and political movements.  These included “news” articles and ghostwritten op-ed pieces planted in various major news outlets.

Some years ago, there was a tremendous scare over avian flu, which was portrayed as threatening a real plague over North America.  I came to conclude that the whole thing was a PR ploy to ennoble public impressions of the pharmaceuticals industry.

The present article sets forth a fanciful notion of what the Sanhedrin may have been thinking during Jesus’ trial.

As to many New Testament stories, my position in the past has been, “This specific thing may not have happened, but something like it probably did.”  There are so many problems with and discrepancies among the Gospel accounts of Jesus’ trial, however, that as a Christian I now doubt he was ever tried by the Sanhedrin at all.

By the time of his arrest, Jesus had become such an irritant to the Jewish leaders that the New Testament easily  portrays them as having wanted him dead.  A conspiracy of the chief priests and Pharisees (John 11:57) to that end would have been singular, as these two parties were otherwise bitter enemies.  The Sanhedrin, however, was without power at the time to condemn anyone to death, for blasphemy or any other reason; so the New Testament portrays “the Jews” as having taken Jesus to Pilate to portray him as an insurrectionist, on which basis Pilate might well put him to death.

My own current belief is that Judas may never have betrayed Jesus into the hands of “the Jews” at all; he may instead have betrayed him directly to Pilate, who I believe had his own, wholly personal, reasons to want Jesus dead.

Related:  The Son of the Blessed

 

 

 

Self-management in the face of depression

I am extremely depressed this morning.  This may be a “monthly.”  I find myself hyper-self-critical; ready to take anything someone may say the wrong way; ready to snap.

I’m dealing with various issues in various places that may help explain it, but as opposed to engaging in excuses or blame, I need to deal with what is.

I was in Dunkin’ Donuts at 9:00 and chose to check the library schedule for this week; to chart out what days I would go to the library and what other days I would go to church.

Continue reading Self-management in the face of depression